The Bowman Society

Dr. James E. Bowman

Dr. James E. Bowman

On March 11, 2005, the Office of Multicultural Affairs at the Pritzker School of Medicine held the inaugural lecture and reception for the Bowman Society. The society and lecture series are named in honor of Dr. James E. Bowman who is Professor Emeritus at the University of Chicago in the Departments of Pathology and Medicine and senior scholar for the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics. Dr. Bowman’s legacy is one of excellence and distinguished service.

Dr. Griffin Rodgers

Dr. Griffin Rodgers

In addition to being an internationally recognized expert in pathology and genetics, Dr. Bowman has mentored and been a role model to many Pritzker students, including many current faculty members at the University of Chicago.

Dr. Bowman served as Assistant Dean of Students for Minority Affairs from 1986 to 1990, Principal Investigator of The University of Chicago’s Comprehensive Sickle Cell Center, and continues to serve on the Committee on Genetics and the Committee on African and African-American Studies.

<em>Walter Conwell holds his commemorative plaque from the AMA as one of ten Minority Scholar Award winners.

Walter Conwell holds his
commemorative plaque from the
AMA as one of ten Minority
Scholar Award winners.

The Bowman Society seeks to honor Dr. Bowman’s living legacy by bringing the University community together to focus attention on scholarship that is important to the healthcare of minority communities and to provide support and career development to individuals at all levels of training and within the academy so as to improve the multicultural diversity within the Biological Sciences Division at The University of Chicago. Dr. Griffin Rodgers, Deputy Director of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and Chief of the Molecular and Clinical Hematology Branch of the National Institutes of Health, served as the inaugural lecturer at the event, held at the Quadrangle Club. Dr. Rodgers is recognized for his continuing research on blood disorders, principally sickle cell disease. He also has been a pioneer in translating basic science discoveries in his field into clinical realities.